Tag Archives: big business

Social Scaling

Social Media Companies get big
because we  want to get big

 

Connection and sharing is why social media works.
As that was accepted and used it became big business.
Big business has it’s responsibilities.
So do we.

 

Social Media companies got us to voluntarily grow their base by allowing us to connect with people for free. Smart plan. This is a great thing, and we all knew it. Since about 2004, it was a new method to easily share information in all sorts of ways. It’s fun – we gained a bit of celebrity, having our post up there for all to see. We try to persuade the world to see it our way. We’re little movie stars.

 

Once that scaled, things began to change. Users egos obfuscated a site’s slow but steady increase in position. By promoting ourselves, we collectively promoted the company. By getting used to it, we couldn’t easily change away from it.

 

Reaching your friends is the main goal here, isn’t it still? And do we even think to call them? Nowhere near as much as we message them from the site or app.
When a big event in your life happens, it’s about our inner circle first and not all the multitudes of “friends.”

 

What a company does, we also do

 

Should we blame the companies without looking at our behavior as well?
We see company changes that slowly remove what we signed up for in our ability to connect as slight betrayals of the original concept. It leaves people feeling misled and manipulated.
Users manipulate too. Users try to get big by posting things that are either larger than life or are otherwise essentially spamming their “friends.” Facebook correctly made changes addressing like-baiting and link-spammers. They are marketing themselves, and often it’s far from the truth.

 

We’re all people involved in the human dynamic. “The company” is still a collection of individuals. What if we were to choose a company as we would a friend, knowing why we associate with them and keeping that straight.

 

A good concept grows when it helps people. I support loyalty to the principle of it’s founding. I support finding new ways of getting what you’re after without violating trust. Continued abuses should force us to rethink the support of our choice. Our habits are hard to break. This is counted upon and where the Titanic principle comes into play.

 

The onus is with us as users and not solely on the social media company.  The benefit of the internet is that we the people get to decide what works. It’s not a company simply putting an ad on TV. Now it’s about connection. And those who do it best, in this era, are and will continue to win.
This connection goes for our personal lives as well.

 

Shared purpose should have mutual benefits. When a business shifts the shared purpose away from the users, it opens the door for the next idea to come forward. Eventually people move to the next thing that delivers the ideal that a company forgot about.
It was thought that the Titanic was never going to sink. But it did. Errors of buying the sales pitch eventually brought it down.

 

Would connection to your real friends go away if your social media accounts did? Are you contacting or are you connecting?
Stay invested in connection.